2. Mar, 2017

Gut microbiota link with Alzheimer's Disease

New research from Lund University in Sweden have found that the microbiome of mice with Alzheimer's has a different composition to those without the disease.

Germ-free mice (completely lacking intestinal bacteria) given intestinal bacteria transfers from Alzheimer's mice, developed more beta-amyloid plaques (lumps that form at the nerve fibres of Alzheimer's sufferers) in the brain, compared to those with transfers from healthy mice. This shows a direct causal link and thanks to a grant from the EU, research can now progress to human trials to see if the effect is the same.

Reference:

Harach, T, Marungruang, N, Duthilleul, N, Cheatham, V, Mc Coy, KD, Frisoni, G, Neher, JJ, Fåk, F, Jucker, M, Lasser, T & Bolmont, T 2017, 'Reduction of Abeta amyloid pathology in APPPS1 transgenic mice in the absence of gut microbiota', Article, Scientific Reports, vol. 7, p. 41802.